Study shows greater heavy metal buildup in autistic children

Some parents have seen positive results from using hyperbaric oxygen therapy for autism.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that, each year, one of every 88 American newborns is affected by autism, a disorder that can pose substantial challenges to social and psychological development. While there is no cure for this condition as of yet, medical practitioners and specialists often advise a combination of prescription medication and behavioral therapy to help address its symptoms.

Recently, researchers from Arizona State University have made a discovery that could have significant ramifications for future autism treatment. According to a press release from the educational institute, the scientists analyzed blood and urine samples of autistic children and found that they contained high amounts of various heavy metals including thalium, lead and tungsten.

They also discovered that the amount of toxic buildup corresponded with where these children fell on the Autism Spectrum – the more substantial the amount of heavy metals, the greater severity of the disorder. Though further studies are necessary to determine whether this is a cause-and-effect relationship, these toxic materials have been shown to interfere with various bodily functions as well as healthy brain development.

"We hypothesize that reducing early exposure to toxic metals may help ameliorate symptoms of autism, and treatment to remove toxic metals may reduce symptoms of autism," the official paper states.

At Longevity Centres of America, we offer a wide range of detoxification treatments, including IV chelation therapy – an intravenous procedure that can extract certain hazardous heavy metals from your system. In addition, some parents have seen positive results from employing hyperbaric oxygen therapy for autism. During this treatment, your body is exposed to 100 percent pure oxygen, which promotes healthy healing and can help with a wide range of ailments from carbon monoxide poising to anemia.